Use an 8-char Windows NTLM password? Don’t. Every single one can be cracked in under 2.5hrs

In 2011 security researcher Steven Myer demonstrated that an eight-character (53-bit) password could be brute forced in 44 days, or in 14 seconds if you use a GPU and rainbow tables – pre-computed tables for reversing hash functions.

NIST’s latest guidelines say passwords should be at least eight characters long. Some online service providers don’t even demand that much.

When security researcher Troy Hunt examined the minimum password lengths at various websites last year, he found that while Google, Microsoft and Yahoo set the bar at eight, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter only required six.

Tinker said the eight character password was used as a benchmark because it’s what many organizations recommend as the minimum password length and many corporate IT policies reflect that guidance.

password

”Because we’ve pushed the idea of using complexity (upper case letters, lower case, numbers, and symbols), it’s hard for users to remember individual passwords,” Tinker said. ”This does, among other things, cause users to pick the minimum length allowed, so that they can remember their complex password. As such, a large percentage of users choose the minimum requirements of eight characters.”

So how long is long enough to sleep soundly until the next technical advance changes everything? Tinker recommends a random five-word passphrase, something along the lines of the four-word example popularized by online comic XKCD, ”correcthorsebatterystaple.”

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/14/password_length/

Security Things to Consider When Your Apartment Goes ‘Smart’

What’s Your Threat Model?

When we’re talking about things that impact personal safety, it’s crucial to think about the specific, realistic threats that we (or our families) face. In this blog, I’m going to talk about ways that consumer IoT and Smart Home systems can be abused to cause risk to safety and privacy. If your number one concern for your safety is a casual criminal breaking your lock and stealing your TV, and the loss of your activity data isn’t something that substantially impacts or bothers you, you might decide that a flawed Smart Home system is an acceptable risk (or even a net benefit).

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