Archive augusti 2018

Enabling trust for connected vehicles

New technologies for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V, Car2Car) and vehicle-to-everything (V2X, Car2X) communication enable assisted and autonomous driving, road safety applications, better road utilization and environment protection. Security is crucial for this communication, for safety and privacy reasons. Cyber attacks can threaten the privacy of the driver, damage the physical equipment, and even risk the lives of persons in and around the vehicle.

https://www.nexusgroup.com/solutions/public-key-infrastructure-pki/internet-of-things-iot-security

Dark Patterns: When Companies Use Design to Manipulate You

“Dark patterns” are designs that deliberately trick you into doing what a company wants. This can take all kinds of forms, from MoviePass not canceling people’s accounts to installers putting crapware on your machine.

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at one point even closing the window offering the update would prompt the installation. A lot of people ended up accidentally installing Windows 10 because of this one, which makes sense: it was almost impossible to tell how to opt out.

https://www.howtogeek.com/363484/dark-patterns-when-companies-use-design-to-manipulate-you/

”VD-bedrägerier” för dummies

Det här inlägget är avsett för att bringa klarhet i det som kanske lite vilseledande kommit att kallas vd-bedrägerier i Sverige. Anledningen till att det kanske är att se som vilseledande är för att det inte alls behöver vara vd:n som används för bedrägeriet. Därför är det engelska uttrycket BEC, ”Business Email Compromise” mer beskrivande, då ”alla” olika roller på ett företag kan användas för ”vd-bedrägerier”

Vd-bedrägerier för dummies

FBI: BUSINESS E-MAIL COMPROMISE: THE 3.1 BILLION DOLLAR SCAM

BEC is defined as a sophisticated scam targeting businesses working with foreign suppliers and/or businesses that regularly perform wire transfer payments. The scam is carried out by compromising legitimate business e-mail accounts through social engineering or computer intrusion techniques to conduct unauthorized transfers of funds.

Most victims report using wire transfers as a common method of transferring funds for business purposes

https://www.ic3.gov/media/2016/160614.aspx

Surveillance: Silicon Valley siphons our data like oil. But the deepest drilling has just begun

Silicon Valley is an extractive industry. Its resource isn’t oil or copper, but data. And to increase profits, Silicon Valley must extract more – and deeper – than we ever imagined

Amazon is going to show the industry how to monitor more moments: by making corporate surveillance as deeply embedded in our physical environment as it is in our virtual one. Silicon Valley already earns vast sums of money from watching what we do online. Soon it’ll earn even more money from watching what we do offline.

It’s easy to picture how this will work, because the technology already exists. Late last year, Amazon built a “smart” grocery store in Seattle. You don’t have to wait in a checkout line to buy something – you just grab it and walk out of the store. Sensors detect what items you pick up, and you’re charged when you leave.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/23/silicon-valley-big-data-extraction-amazon-whole-foods-facebook

Messaging Apps: Here’s Why You Should Use Signal

Signal looks and works a lot like other basic messaging apps, so it’s easy to get started. It’s especially convenient if you have friends and family overseas because, like iMessage and WhatsApp, Signal lets you sidestep expensive international SMS fees. It also supports voice and video calls, so you can cut out Skype and FaceTime. You can send pictures, videos, and documents.

It’s available on iOS, Android, and desktop.

Plenty of apps have all that stuff. The thing that actually makes Signal superior is that it’s easy to ensure that the contents of every chat remain private and unable to be read by anyone else.

https://www.wired.com/story/ditch-all-those-other-messaging-apps-heres-why-you-should-use-signal/
https://signal.org/

Why privacy is important, and having ”nothing to hide” is irrelevant

It doesn’t matter if you have “nothing to hide”. Privacy is a right granted to individuals that underpins the freedoms of expression, association and assembly; all of which are essential for a free, democratic society.

Loss of privacy leads to loss of freedom.

Your freedom of expression is threatened by the surveillance of your internet usage – thought patterns and intentions can be extrapolated from your website visits (rightly or wrongly), and the knowledge that you are being surveilled can make you less likely to research a particular topic. You lose that perspective, and your thought can be pushed in one direction as a result. Similarly, when the things you write online, or communicate privately to others, are surveilled, and you self-censor as a result, the rest of us lose your perspective, and the development of further ideas is stifled.

Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.

– Edward Snowden

https://robindoherty.com/2016/01/06/nothing-to-hide.html

The Privacy Threat From Always-On Microphones Like the Amazon Echo

It is a significant thing to allow a live microphone in your private space (just as it is to allow them in our public spaces). Once the hardware is in place, and receiving electricity, and connected to the Internet, then you’re reduced to placing your trust in the hands of two things that unfortunately are less than reliable these days: 1) software, and 2) policy.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/privacy-threat-always-microphones-amazon-echo